With some states legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana, it’s easy for someone in recovery to think its okay to go back to using marijuana after having not used for a period of time. It’s important for an individual to remember that no matter what the circumstances are, the behavior is almost always a bigger problem than the substance itself and the progression of addiction never stops. Abstinence based treatment has always been the most effective form of treatment and results in the highest success rates. It’s important to educate people with the facts when it comes to marijuana but it’s even more important to educate them about the disease of addiction as well as the impact marijuana use can have on recovery and treatment.

Ever hear a term used by a friend or loved one and not know what it is? Do you suspect someone may be using a drug but unsure of what substance? Below is a list of “street names” for five of the most commonly abused drugs: Oxycodone, methamphetamine, crystal meth, marijuana, heroin, and cocaine.

1. Oxycodone (Brand name Oxycotin)  Common Drug Street Names

  • Oxy

  • O

  • OC

  • Cotton

  • Oxy 80’s

  • Kickers

  • Cotton

  • Hillbilly Heroin

2. Methamphetamine

  • Meth

  • Beanies

  • Speed

  • Crank

  • Chicken feed

  • Cinnamon

3. Crystal Meth

  • Crystal

  • Tina

  • Cris/Cristy

  • Glass

  • Tweak

  • Shards

  • Ice

  • Quartz

3. Marijuana

  • Weed

  • Pot

  • Ganja

  • Grass

  • Herb

  • Skunk

  • Blunt

  • Hemp

  • Joint

  • Puff

  • Splif

  • Mary Jane

  • Hemp

  • Herb

  • Purple Haze

4. Heroin

  • Smack

  • Thunder

  • Horse

  • H

  • Dope

  • Junk

  • Black tar

  • Mud

  • Brown sugar

5. Cocaine

  • Blow

  • Snow

  • Coke/Cola

  • Blizzard

  • Powder

  • Sniff

  • Nose candy

  • Dust

  • Toot

You can find out more at the following sites:

www.drugabuse.gov

www.dea.gov

 

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

New Hope Recovery Center is located in Chicago and offers individualized alcohol and drug addiction treatment in a loving supportive environment.  Contact New Hope Recovery Center at 888-707- 4673 (HOPE).

 

 

 

Teens and Marijuana: National Drug Facts Week

 

Articles about Teens and Marijuana by New Hope Recovery Center:

 Teenage Marijuana Use Affects Brain Development

Is Your Teen Smoking Pot: 38 Warning Signs

Marijuana and Addiction Treatment

 

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

 

Heavy teenage marijuana use could damage brain structures critical to memory and reasoning and the effects may be long lasting. Heavy pot use during teenage years is also connected with lower IQ.  It is well known that the human brain is not fully developed until 25-28 years of age.  Chronic or heavy pot use by teenagers may affect the brain as it develops, perhaps permanently.  A number of interesting recent studies look at marijuana use by teens and the possible effects it has on brain development.

Marijuana and Memory

According to new research by Northwestern Medicine, the brains of heavy marijuana teen users were altered in regions that involve memory and reasoning. Young people with such alterations performed worse on memory tests than the non-using control subjects, despite the fact that the heavy users had not used marijuana for more than two years, on average, before the testing.

The study looked at MRI brain scans of several areas of the brain.  Heavy pot users showed greater brain abnormalities than those who had not used marijuana. The researchers found that memory-related brain structures appeared to shrink and collapse inward. These findings could indicate long-term detriments to chronic marijuana use during the teen years.

Although this study doesn't prove causation, it does provide evidence of a need for caution.  It also showed that the earlier or younger the pot use began, the greater the brain’s abnormalities.

Mental Illness and Marijuana Connection

In June 2013, an Australian study showed that prolonged use of cannabis or marijuana by young adults was linked to a higher risk of developing psychosis.  The highest risk was for those who started using the substance in their teens, and continued using it for 6 years or more into adulthood. For this group, the risk of developing psychosis was more than double that of those who never used marijuana.

Marijuana and Dopamine

A recent study by Imperial College London revealed that long-term use of cannabis depletes dopamine, the feel-good chemical in the brain that inspires a spirit of get-up-and-go.  The study found greater dopamine depletion if marijuana use was heavier and if the first initial use was at an earlier age.

Marijuana and IQ

A long term study in New Zealand indicates that early and long term marijuana use may cause IQ to decrease.  The study measured IQ prior to age 13 and then surveyed over 1000 participants from a single city born in the same year over a period of decades.  According to the study, IQ decreased an average of 7-8 points by age 38 for those who used marijuana heavily at some point in the 25 years between ages 13 and 38, with greater decreases in IQ for those with longer periods of heavy marijuana use.

Conclusions

All of the studies show correlations and not actual direct cause.  However, we are seeing that heavy marijuana use in teens could be creating possible lasting changes in the brain.  The earlier heavy use begins, the greater the changes to the brain.

New Hope Recovery Center is Chicago’s premier addiction treatment facility.  If you would like information about our programs, including our New Hope with Pride program, contact us at 888-707-4636 (HOPE), info@new-hope-recovery.com or visit us in person or online.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

Want more information about marijuana or young adults and addiction? Check out our Journal for related articles or see below: 

Marijuana Warning Signs: Is Your Teen Smoking Weed? Are you concerned your teenager or young adult is using marijuana? Below you will find the warning signs and symptoms for marijuana use. Marijuana use is very controversial across the nation, but something that cannot be denied, is the detrimental effect it has on young adults. It has been proven that young adults/teenagers who use marijuana have more problems with memory, attention and learning. They also struggle with their school performance, have an increased risk of problematic behaviors, and are more likely to suffer from depression and or anxiety.

Marijuana and Addiction Treatment All too often people enter treatment for addiction from a variety of substances with the belief that marijuana is not a drug.  “Alcohol is my problem, not marijuana” or “Marijuana is not addictive” – the list of justifications people use could fill an entire page.  We have all heard the term “gateway drug” in reference to marijuana but often the thought process is that this occurs early in the stages of addiction. However, we have seen that marijuana can be a gateway drug at any point in addiction or recovery.

Fighting Peer Pressure: 3 Ways To Limit Addiction Risk in Young Adults Do you remember growing up and wanting to be liked and included in your peer group?  One of the hardest parts of growing up is feeling excluded from peer groups and while this can be challenging, it is also a normal part of the development of an Emerging Adult.  If it did not come naturally, you might remember changing your attitudes, values or behaviors to belong a certain peer group, which is exactly where your Emerging Adult may be developmentally.  Something that young adults may do to fit into a certain peer group is use drugs and alcohol as a means to fit in.  You can help them avoid drug or alcohol abuse and the risk of addiction by teaching useful skills for handling peer pressure and maneuvering this critical period of life.

Student Drug Abuse Warning Signs Young adults face many temptations and opportunities to use and abuse drugs and alcohol.  As a parent, it is important to allow for appropriate independence and growth for your student or young adult, but also to keep a watchful eye looking for warning signs or symptoms of drug or alcohol use/addiction. Part of growing up involves making mistakes and hopefully learning from them.  These teachable moments allow students and emerging adults to learn how to respond better in the future.  Students and emerging adults may not always be able to quickly identify and correct mistakes or difficulties they face. They also are more susceptible to peer pressure or having their viewpoints shaped by outside influences. For this reason, parents need to be closely aware of what is happening in their young adult’s life.

Long Term Impact of Alcohol and Drug Use on Emerging Adults Emerging Adulthood, the period of life from approximately age 18 to the late 20s, is not only a critical time for psychological and social development, but also for physical brain development. Contrary to a popular assumption that the brain is mature by the age of 18, recent studies have shown that profound brain growth and change still occur during Emerging Adulthood. [Studies]  The heavy use of drugs and alcohol during this time frame can inhibit a person’s brain development and have long term consequences.

 

 

All too often people enter treatment for addiction from a variety of substances with the belief that marijuana is not a drug.  “Alcohol is my problem, not marijuana” or “Marijuana is not addictive” - the list of justifications people use could fill an entire page.  We have all heard the term “gateway drug” in reference to marijuana but often the thought process is that this occurs early in the stages of addiction. However, we have seen that marijuana can be a gateway drug at any point in addiction or recovery.

Contrary to what many believe - marijuana IS a drug.  Although a relapse on marijuana won’t cause immediate death, it’s no less dangerous than any other relapse.  Many people have stated that a relapse to their drug of choice often began with marijuana.  It begins sometimes slowly or sometimes quickly but always ends with the same outcome.

By smoking marijuana, an individual triggers the feeling of getting high and it’s not long before they are looking for the high that they experienced the first time they used the drug.  Soon they begin engaging in the same behaviors and pattern of usage that led them to seek treatment previously.  Health concerns, trouble at work and school, relationship strains are just some of the problems we see from marijuana use which are universal problems seen with most drugs and alcohol.

With some states legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana, it’s easy for someone in recovery to think its okay to go back to using marijuana after having not used for a period of time.  It’s important for an individual to remember that no matter what the circumstances are, the behavior is almost always a bigger problem than the substance itself and the progression of addiction never stops.

Abstinence based treatment has always been the most effective form of treatment and results in the highest success rates.  It’s important to educate people with the facts when it comes to marijuana but it’s even more important to educate them about the disease of addiction as well as the impact marijuana use can have on recovery and treatment.

New Hope Recovery Center Chicago has substantial experience treating all forms of addiction including marijuana.  If you or a loved one has been negatively affected by the use of drugs or alcohol, please contact us at 773-883-3916 or via email at info@new-hope-recovery.com for an assessment.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center