Addiction and alcoholism is often referred to as brain disease characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite harmful consequences. Addiction takes many shapes and forms and is not defined by what you use, how much you use, or when you use but rather by what happens when you use. It is progressive and if someone does not seek help via meetings, treatment, therapy, etc, it could lead to death or an array of other consequences.

chicago rehab new hope recovery centerWritten by a New Hope Recovery Center Family Alumni

After dropping my husband off at New Hope Recovery Center a year and a half ago, I felt every imaginable emotion - relief, fear, anger, confusion, sadness, and utter exhaustion.  I had no idea what was to come and the unknown is scary for me.  Little did I know that this would be as life changing of an experience for me as it was for him.  He entered the Residential Day Treatment Program (RDT) at New Hope, transitioned into their Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for approximately 4 weeks and then participated in their Aftercare Program.  I was, and continue to be, extremely grateful that this programming existed and provided the continuity he needed for his recovery.  The diverse programming at New Hope ranges from art therapy to yoga to individual/group/family counseling sessions just to name a few and this provided him with a holistic and well-rounded therapeutic experience.  Most importantly, New Hope Recovery Center provided him with a community of others going through similar struggles.  This was an immense relief for me because I cannot begin to understand the desire to keep drinking.  He now has other people to talk with and this feels like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders.

Not only did New Hope Recovery Center help him, but it also allowed me to begin my own healing.  While he was involved with his own community, I was able to find my own which I hadn’t known previously was possible.  A staff member at New Hope informed me about Al-Anon - a 12-step program for family and friends of alcoholics based off of the 12-steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, and since then, I have been attending meetings regularly and working on my own recovery.  As a family member, I didn’t realize that alcoholism is a family disease.  I kept thinking, “It’s his problem, I’m fine.  I’m the one holding it all together!”  Maybe this is how I thought, but after coming home that evening I just broke down.  I felt lost, confused...and very alone.  I started to realize how much my husband’s alcoholism had affected my own behavior which included the need to control, constant worry, fear of the future, and feelings of anger and resentment.  I am now able to be aware of, and address these behaviors, as they arise with the help of the Al-Anon program and fellowship.

New Hope Recovery Center asked me to start an Al-Anon meeting for family members of their current clients.  This has been a beneficial service for myself and for others.  To say that I am grateful for the kindness, understanding, and informative staff at New Hope, along with their various therapeutic offerings, is an understatement.  New Hope Recovery Center gave my husband and I the tools we needed for recovery, and using those tools has been a true gift for us.