New Hope Recovery Center offers personalized, holistic treatment by examining the whole person: mind, body and spirit. Their small intimate setting caters to your specific needs and we provide place of support, nurture and safety leading to hope and healing. They believe length of treatment directly impacts the chances for long-term recovery. For this reason they offer a variety of levels of care to better equip an individual to create the life they desire. The caring and experienced clinical staff provides the emotional, physical and spiritual healing necessary to identify the core issues that underlie the addiction and in turn create an extraordinary life of productive, balanced sober living.

If you are looking into drug and alcohol rehab for yourself or someone else, it may be confusing to hear terms like inpatient rehab (or residential), outpatient rehab (or IOP) and partial hospitalization (or PHP).

What Are The Differences Between Inpatient Rehab, Outpatient Rehab And Partial Hospitalization?

Inpatient Rehab or Residential Treatment These programs involve completely removing the addict from the environment and the individuals that enabled or reinforced their addiction.  With inpatient rehab, the recovering addict can focus intensely on their addictive behavior instead of their drug or alcohol use.  Residential Treatment, sometimes known as an In-Patient Program, is often 28 days or longer, depending on the severity of the addiction. Inpatient rehab removes the addicted person from the current triggers in their environment and social circles.  The addiction rehab facility provides a safe place to temporarily live while dealing with addiction and any underlying issues the addict is facing.

Most inpatient rehab programs have restrictions on visitation, the use of electronics and cell phones and leaving the treatment facility.  These programs are staffed 24 hours a day. They combine a sober living environment with intensive group counseling and individual drug counseling.

Outpatient Rehab or IOP (Intensive Outpatient) – IOP involves attending treatment for a portion of the day while living in a location other than the treatment center.  The living environment needs to be safe and sober for the best possible outcome.  Generally, recovering addicts are allowed to leave the treatment center before and after treatment.  IOP is best for those who have a safe and sober environment to live, who are able to focus on treatment and who are able to handle the temptations and triggers that may arise when not at the rehab center.

Partial Hospitalization (PHP) - Partial Hospitalization involves full day treatment with living arrangements in a sober living facility or in a safe home environment.  It has fewer restrictions than inpatient rehab, but allows for more intensive treatment than IOP.

Similarities Between Inpatient Rehab, Outpatient Rehab and Partial Hospitalization – The goal of Addiction Rehab programs is to help the addict recover from drug/alcohol addiction by addressing the addiction and underlying issues that contribute to the addiction. Although drug rehab and alcohol rehab treatment options are somewhat unique, top quality addiction treatment programs contain certain core areas. Here are several aspects that the best drug and alcohol addiction programs have in common:

Group Therapy - Group therapy teaches the value of reaching out and relying on others, including other people in recovery who have similar experiences and challenges. Group therapy provides a sense of belonging.  There are other recovering people who believe in you and will identify and understand what you are going through. Group therapy also gives a chance to receive and offer feedback to specific issues that are being addressed in treatment.  This allows for a deeper understanding of your situation.

Individual Therapy/Drug Counseling - Individual therapy involves private meetings between you and your counselor.  It allows you to work through specific issues which you may have difficulty addressing in a group setting. It also allows you the benefit of direct confidential input from your counselor.  While group sessions are designed to teach you to receive support from, and lend support to, others, individual session allows you to work privately with a counselor.

Self Discovery - One of the most important benefits of the best addiction rehab programs is the amount of time and the tools provided to learn about yourself.  Learning includes discovery of your limitations, boundaries, assets, liabilities, strengths, weaknesses, losses in life and what is gained from ending addiction.

Family Involvement - Family programming is an essential part of any treatment program. Addiction is truly a family disease and impacts your family and friends.   Also, there are behaviors in the family dynamics that are wrapped up in the disease of addiction. Ideally these are addressed with the family members while the addict is being helped.  The success of any addiction rehab program depends on including family members and close friends.  Research suggests that including family and friends in the education and participation in the addiction treatment process improves the outcome.

In the family program, your family members and friends will learn about the disease of addiction and learn to identify strengths and resources to help themselves and to encourage you in your recovery. Some addiction treatment programs require family members and friends to attend Al-Anon meetings.

Which Is The Best Addiction Treatment?  The answer depends on your situation.  Some people are self-motivated and able to integrate addiction treatment into their current living environment and daily life.  The home environment is safe and sober and the person is able to resist temptations and triggers met during the normal day.  For these people IOP/Intensive Outpatient may be a good option.  Some people need a new environment, closer guidance and monitored surroundings in order to achieve sobriety.  For these people, inpatient rehab is likely the best option.  When inpatient rehab is completed, a transition to Intensive Outpatient is generally recommended.  The goals is to help transition the person back into their life with as many tools and supports as possible.

New Hope Recovery Center offers Partial Hospitalization Treatment, Intensive Outpatient Rehab in Chicago.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

LGBT AddictionDid you know there is an increased risk for substance abuse and addiction for those LGBTQ individuals who are dealing with any stage of the coming out process?

What is Coming Out?

Many people don’t understand what is involved in coming out (disclosing one’s sexual orientation or gender identity).  Most envision it to be like walking through one doorway, a single time.  But it is far from that simple.  Maybe for a few celebrities who can come out in a national publication, it only involves one disclosure or interaction, but for most LGBTQ individuals, coming out is a life-long process repeated again and again. This process can be filled with stress and anxiety as the LGBTQ person contemplates who it is safe to come out to and when.

The decision to come out is one of the defining moments in an LGBTQ person’s life.  Let’s look at what is involved in coming out, how an LGBTQ individual may feel or think during the process and why LGBTQ individuals are susceptible to risks of addiction and substance abuse.

Understanding Oneself Requires Understanding Our Culture

For many LGBTQ people, based on the world they see around them, they only know one way in which it is ok to live, and that is heterosexual.  The dream they have heard since infancy is to fall in love with the opposite sex, get married, have children, and live happily ever after.   But LGBTQ people grow up feeling different.  They know they don’t quite fit in, something seems off and they sense it is them.  They often feel less than others.  They believe, and are often told by those who are close to them, that being straight is how their lives are supposed to be.

Many LGBTQ individuals feel as if they should be like everyone else.  Not fitting in, struggling to fit in and even trying to understand how they think and feel can lead to feelings of deep shame.   Many spend years hiding and denying they are LGBTQ from everyone, including themselves.  Being LGBTQ can be so foreign to them that they don’t have a way to understand who they are.

Our society is very much oriented toward heterosexuality, it is a given.  So young LGBTQ often don’t have a concept of anything other than heterosexuality.  Fortunately TV, movies, books and public discussion about LGBT rights are changing this.  But it is a slow change.  And growing up feeling and thinking differently from everyone else can be lonely.  It can also be tragic.  Suicide among Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual teens is 4 times higher than non-LGBT teens. Bullying (9 out of 10 LGBT teens report being bullied in the past year at school because of sexual orientation), gay-bashing, discrimination (it is legal to discriminate against LGBT individuals in 29 states), violent anti-gay hate crimes (including murder) are still happening around the country.  Is it any wonder LGBTQ individuals struggle with accepting their sexuality or their true gender?

Why Come Out?

For someone who is questioning their sexuality or gender identity, the first person they have to be honest with is themselves.  Not being your true self leaves you susceptible to low self-esteem, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and suicide.

So, the first step in coming out is to come out to oneself internally, accepting one’s own sexuality or gender.  Although this may seem to be an easy thing, it is usually not. There are many pressures on LGBTQ individuals to not fully accept themselves as being gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.  Bullying, fear of being harmed or killed, fear of being disowned by family and friends and fear of discrimination are all real possibilities for many.  It can often seem easier to deny a part of themselves instead of facing these consequences.  However, denying one’s true self leads to an incredible amount of stress, anxiety and additional fear.  If we are not ourselves, we cannot form real relationships because we know the relationship is not based on our real selves.

The benefits to truly being oneself outweigh all the real and imagined risks of being LGBTQ.  However, when someone is struggling with self-acceptance, the potential risks and consequences of coming out can seem enormous.  For those struggling with sexuality or gender identity, it can be helpful to read what others have experienced.  There are a number of great books on the subject of coming out, including the classic “Coming Out: An Act of Love” by Rob Eichberg.

And one final reason to come out: It Gets Better.  It really does.  Truly being oneself is worth the risks.  Thanks to Dan Savage and Terry Miller for creating the “It Gets Better” videos and book.  They have brought real awareness to the issue of coming out and bullying and have provided inspiration to millions.

It is important to realize that the period of coming out prior to full self-acceptance can be very lonely and very stressful.  Many LGBT individuals turn to drugs or alcohol to ease the pain and suffering they are experiencing.  To help these individuals with their addiction, most find it best to seek an addiction treatment program that understands and caters to the unique needs of LGBTQ persons.  New Hope Recovery Center’s “New Hope With Pride”, is such a program.  You can reach us at 888-707-4673 or info@new-hope-recovery.com.

 

You may also be interested in reading: Addiction Recovery and Self Esteem

Looking into addiction treatment programs (rehab) for yourself or a loved one can seem overwhelming.  Generally life is already stressful and unmanageable.  Trying to understand what options are available within the treatment world and what would work best is not an easy task.  To give you a starting point, here are 5 frequently asked questions about rehab and addiction treatment that will lead you in the right direction.

1.  How Much Does Addiction Treatment Cost?

The cost of treatment varies greatly based on the provider. It could be free or it could cost over $50,000.00. Many addiction treatment services are covered by insurance.  However, insurance coverage varies greatly by the carrier and the client's specific policy. Some treatment centers don't accept insurance, which means you may need to pay out of pocket at admission, and the provider will "Super Bill" you meaning you pay cash and they give you a bill to submit to insurance yourself. Insurance does not reimburse this amount at 100% or sometimes at all, which can be financially draining on the client and their family members. To avoid this, call your insurance carrier and ask them who is in network, your insurance company should be able to give you a list of facilities to choose from.

New Hope Recovery Center takes most major insurance and can check your benefits for you to determine what coverage you or your loved one has for addiction treatment.  Its important for treatment centers to review your insurance benefits with you and let you know if there are any costs you will need to pay prior to admission. Unexpected financial burdens can just cause more heartache during the recovery process, so if you ask the right questions up front, you should be able to alleviate unexpected bills later on down the road. Some questions that will be helpful when finding out about your insurance  coverage are: (1) Is there is a deductible and if so, how much has been met?  Are there any co-pays? (2) Is pre-certification required? (3) Do you need a PCP (primary care physician) referral (HMO policies only)? (4) If there is a maximum out of pocket cost and if so, how much has been met? (5) Is there a maximum number of sessions available? 

If you do not have insurance and cannot afford out of pocket expenses, state funded programs may be available in your area. Unfortunately, many state funded programs have wait lists and it can be difficult to qualify for treatment. The sooner you call, the sooner you can get in treatment. Always leave your name on the wait-list, they occasionally go quicker than than expected. Not all treatment centers participate in state funded options, but some may have scholarship opportunities or sliding scales. The important thing is to ask the questions about cost before your loved one gets admitted. It is important to remember, some people need to go to treatment more than once to obtain long term recovery, so find a place that fits your needs and is within your budget, paying tens of thousands of dollars on a treatment center will not guarantee your loved one will stay sober. 

2.  How Long Does Treatment Last?

Treatment will depend on the severity and/or type of addiction(s) a person suffers from. Treatment may range from:

  • Hospital based detoxification – Generally 3 to 7 days
  • Residential treatment program – 30 to 60 days
  • Partial Hospital Program (Day Program) – 1 to 4 weeks
  • Intensive Outpatient Program – 4 to 6 weeks
  • Aftercare Program - 6 to 24 months 

Providers offer different levels of treatment, you may need to go to a hospital for detoxification, and then transfer to a residential facility for treatment depending on the provider's continuum of care. Many treatment programs works with each other to ensure a smooth transition from one treatment center to another. 

3.  How Do I Know What Treatment Program Will Work For Me?

Treatment will only really work for you if you work it. Most addicts exhibit impulsive, compulsive, and obsessive thoughts and behaviors which will need to be overcome in order to succeed in rehab.  Also other areas of life can directly affect the chances of a successful treatment outcome. Having supportive friends and family, living in a safe environment, devoting time to your recovery can all  increase the chances of a successful recovery.  It is essential to be open, honest and willing to do whatever is necessary to begin living a sober life. What you put into it will be what you get out of it. It is important to put recovery first.

When looking into a treatment program, ask what the program consists of, visit the location, meet with counselors and staff. Most treatment centers will offer a free assessment to determine what level of care is most appropriate. The best treatment facility for you is one where you feel comfortable, where you feel welcomed and where you will want to stay.

4.  What Kind Of Family Involvement Is Needed?

For the best possible treatment results, family involvement is crucial. Addiction is a family disease, which means treating one member of the family will not ensure long term recovery for the family.  It affects everyone in the family and so the family must work toward wellness.  Even if there have been previous treatment episodes, family involvement is one of the most effective ways to heal the family and its members. Some providers have extended family programs which include support groups, such as, Al-anon and Family Anonymous.

5.  What Is The Process For Getting Into Rehab For Addiction?

The process begins by calling and speaking with an intake person and/or a certified alcohol and drug counselor who can answer any questions you may have. If you and the treatment center feel there is a good fit based on your situation, there will usually be an assessment to establish the severity of the addiction and other problem(s) and to determine what level of treatment is necessary. Information about the process at New Hope Recovery Center: Admissions Process.

Addiction is a progressive and fatal disease.  The longer an addicted person remains in treatment, the better the outcome.

For more information about finding a treatment center right for you, contact New Hope Recovery Center. If you are concerned about yourself or a loved one, it is important to call and go in for an assessment with a professional.  All assessments at New Hope Recovery Center are confidential with no obligation for further treatment. Recovery is possible, let us help. Call us at 888-707-4673 or email us at info@new-hope-recovery.com.

If you are considering addiction treatment, you may find these articles helpful as well:

Prescription Drug Rehab: 5 Important Questions to Ask

Overcoming the Fears of Going to Addiction Treatment

Intensive Outpatient Treatment: The New Standard?

Drug or Alcohol Addiction Rehab in Chicago

How to Find the Best Treatment Center in Chicago

 

Looking for Prescription Drug Rehab?  You are not alone.  Prescription drugs have become a serious concern.  In 2013, nearly 60% of all drug overdose deaths resulted from prescription drugs. Approximately two thirds of prescription drug abusers get them from family and/or friends.  If you believe someone you know is abusing or addicted to prescription drugs, look for these prescription drug warning signs.

How do you find the best Prescription Drug Rehab for you or your loved one?

There are a number of factors to consider in selecting the prescription drug treatment that will work best.

 1. Are you or your loved one abusing prescriptions that they are prescribed by your doctor?  If so, be sure to have the prescribing doctor involved in the addiction treatment.  The need for your prescription will be considered in order to find possible solutions.  You will want the addiction treatment provider to work closely with your doctor.  Your doctor may replace your prescriptions with non-addictive drugs, or may reduce your dosage, or may offer other alternatives to the drug that is the concern.  The important thing is to be honest about your prescription drug use with both the doctor and the rehab staff.

2. Are you or your loved one addicted to opiate-based drugs? If so, your treatment may include medications to aid in your recovery.  More addiction treatment rehab centers work with clients who are prescribed medications for recovery from opiate addiction, such as Suboxone and Vivitrol.  Consider finding an addiction treatment facility that will work with clients on Vivitrol and/or Suboxone if you are addicted to opiate prescriptions such as vicodin, oxycontin and codeine.

3. What are you or your loved one’s unique characteristics? You will want an addiction rehab choice that works extensively with people having characteristics similar to yours or your loved ones.  What is your age?  Find addiction treatment options that treat people in your age range.  The elderly, young adults and working parents have different treatment needs. What is your gender?  Some treatment centers specialize in serving only one gender, some have individualized groups devoted to a specific gender.  Both of these alternatives allow you to receive more personalized treatment. What is your sexuality?  If you are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual or Transgender, consider finding an addiction facility that caters to the unique needs and circumstances of LGBT clients. What is your race, culture, religion and nationality?  Look for addiction rehab centers that understand your race, culture and nationality.  This will help you feel comfortable, which is very important for your treatment.  It also will allow your treatment to be customized to your situation.

4. What is your past treatment experience?  If you have received treatment for your addiction in the past, consider what led to your relapse.  Would you benefit from treatment that is different  in some way from what you experienced in the past?  A different location?  More involvement from family and friends? One specializing in your unique circumstances?    Longer period of treatment?  Smaller size?  

5. Do you feel comfortable at the facility and with the staff?  Seeking treatment is stressful and anxiety provoking.  However, even with these feelings, can you imagine feeling comfortable at the treatment location?  You will be spending your time at the facility and with the staff.  Do you feel welcomed, appreciated and understood?  Do you feel like you will be treated with dignity and respect? This is important for your recovery.

If you or your loved one is struggling with an addiction to or is abusing prescription drugs, seek help immediately.  Prescription drug abuse is dangerous, as shown by the high number of prescription drug overdose deaths mentioned above.  New Hope Recovery Center offers individualized treatment for prescription drugs and for many other addictions.  You can reach us at 888-707-HOPE (4673) or info@new-hope-recovery.com.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

The recent death of Phillip Seymour Hoffman has once again shined a spotlight on heroin addiction. A true epidemic that is not only impacting inner cities, suburbs and rural areas, but also poor, middle and upper classes, the rich and famous included. Phillip Seymour Hoffman passed away in his New York City apartment on February 2nd, 2014 from a drug overdose. In his home police found heroin, as well as several different prescription medications, such as xanax and klonopin. This tragic event has reminded us that addiction is a life threatening chronic disease that does not discriminate. Many people believe that drug addiction only impacts the poor who live in the gutter.  But  addiction can take any life at anytime. Regardless of who the victim is, where they live or what they do for a living.  Overdose deaths related to heroin and opiates have continued to increase and the numbers are staggering.

Phillip Seymour Hoffman was an Academy Award winning actor, who was not only loved by millions around the world, but was also considered one of the most respected actors of his time by his peers. Hoffman started his career with humble beginnings taking supporting roles in TV dramas such as “Law and Order”, but shortly moved to supporting roles in Hollywood films such as “Scent of a Woman” and “Boogie Nights”. In 2004 Hoffman played the starring role in the Truman Capote biopic “Capote”.  It was this role that won him an academy award for best actor. On paper and on screen, we saw what seemed to be a very successful actor, who when not working on his art, was spending time his family.

Hoffman attended New York University, which is where his problems with addiction began. He has stated in interviews that he would use whatever he could get his hands on. It was during these years that his drug use went from experimenting, to abuse and finally to addiction/dependency. In 1989, when Hoffman graduated he checked himself into a 28 day inpatient addiction treatment center.  He remained sober for 23 years. It was during these 23 years of sobriety that he did the majority of his acting and reached goals few actors ever reach. Little is known about Hoffman’s personal life; he was notoriously secretive and would rarely talk about his family or personal life in interviews. What we do know is that throughout the years, addiction stayed with him. Addiction, like diabetes, is a chronic disease which can go into remission, but can also reoccur at anytime if not managed properly.

Sadly, Phillip Seymour Hoffman’s addiction to heroin and other drugs reoccurred after 23 years of sobriety.  In 2012, it was reported that Hoffman had began using heroin again after being prescribed strong opiate pain medication for a procedure he had the same year. The use of heroin after using opiate painkillers is a story we see and hear about quite often.  In fact, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse nearly half of all young heroin intravenous users first abused prescription opioids.

In May 2012, Hoffman checked himself into a treatment program for 10 days, but at some point continued to use. 23 years sober and still struggling with addiction, Hoffman found himself in the exact place he was in 23 years prior.

On February 2nd, the world lost Phillip Seymour Hoffman to his addiction. The initial reaction to his death was a mixture of shock and sadness. The world was shocked we had a lost such an accomplished actor we all loved to addiction, but what the world missed is that Phillip Seymour Hoffman was no different than any other type of addict. Hoffman suffered from a progressive disease that when untreated can be fatal. Addiction does not discriminate.

If two good things can come out of this tragic story, it’s the increased awareness of addiction in general and the proof that even after years of sobriety, addiction can claim lives, because addiction is not curable and people have to fight everyday for their sobriety. Phillip Seymour Hoffman was a successful, respected man with a loving family.  Mr. Hoffman starred in over 50 films, won countless awards for his art and will be considered one of the most respected actors of our time. He had been sober for 23 years, but somehow the addiction reclaimed his life.  Underneath all this there was an addict and the addict in Phillip Seymour Hoffman was no different than the addict without a home you walk past on the street, the addict who makes your coffee in the morning or the addict who lives next door to you.

There is hope for those with addictions.  Many in Hollywood and elsewhere are urging people to speak out and better understand addiction as the disease it truly is.  Demi Lovato stated. “I wish more people would lose the stigma and treat addiction as the deadly and serious DISEASE that it is.” Addiction can be treated.  When it is not treated it can ruin and end lives.  If you or someone you know has an addiction, reach out for help.

New Hope Recovery Center is Chicago’s premier addiction treatment facility offering treatment for heroin, alcohol and other substances.  You can reach us at info@new-hope-recovery.com, 773-883-3916 or visit us at 2835 N. Sheffield Ave., #304, Chicago IL 60657.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

Want more information about Heroin? Check out our Journal for related articles or see below:

Chicago Heroin Addiction and Facts Heroin use in Chicago and surrounding suburbs has continued to escalate.  Heroin is an extremely addictive opioid drug that is synthesized from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seedpod of the Asian opium poppy plant. Heroin usually appears as a white or brown powder or as a black sticky substance, known as “black tar heroin.”

Heroin Abuse Warning Signs Heroin has been receiving more attention in the news recently. CBS NEWS: Hooked on Heroin;  NY TIMES: Heroin in New England, More Abundant and Deadly; BBC News: Cory Monteith: The Heroin users that don’t fit the ‘junkie’ stereotype; USA Today: OxyContin a Gateway to Heroin for Upper-Income Addicts. Although it can be upsetting this is very helpful because greater awareness about Heroin and its warning signs can help save lives.   Sadly heroin use has increased all over the US, including in the Chicagoland area.

Parents’ Guide to Prevent Heroin Use and Addiction We previously discussed Chicago’s heroin epidemic and saw that the rapid increase in young adults becoming addicted to heroin is truly startling. There are steps that parents can take to prevent their loved ones from becoming a sad statistic of the heroin epidemic.

Chicago’s Heroin Epidemic – Parents Beware As an addiction treatment center in Lincoln Park, Chicago, we see trends in addiction first hand.  Although all addictions are heartbreaking, nothing has touched us as deeply as the current heroin epidemic among young people.  We have seen young adults in their late teens and early twenties struggling to recover from one of the most dangerous, addictive and life-threatening drugs.  It is a hard struggle – for both the addicts and their families.

Heroin (Opiate) Addiction – Suboxone vs. Vivitrol Medication-assisted treatment for addiction, especially opiates (such as Heroin, Vicodin, and Oxycontin), is not new nor is the controversy that accompanies it.  The most recent controversy involves the use of medications to aid in the treatment of opiate addiction, with Suboxone and Vivitrol receiving the most press.  There is an abundant amount of information available on the internet – unfortunately not all of it is accurate. Keep in mind the choice whether to use medication to assist in opiate addiction rehab is a personal decision best made with accurate information and support from an informed addiction health care team.

“Admitted to ourselves, another person and our higher power the exact nature of our wrongs”

The fifth step in addiction recovery is one of the steps that has a large impact on members. After completing the fourth step by doing a moral inventory, you now share it.  This is considered to be somewhat of a spiritual experience in itself. The fifth step simply put, is taking your fourth step and thoroughly going over it (sharing it) with your sponsor and your higher power, whatever that may be.

Prior to starting the fifth step in addiction recovery, it is important to thoroughly complete the fourth step. Once you have a properly prepared fourth step, it’s time to pick a date, a safe place and begin your fifth step with your sponsor. Going through your moral inventory can be a rigorous, emotional task that takes time and determination, but the reward is far greater than the struggle.

What does Step 5 do for our addiction recovery?

The fifth step gives us an opportunity to put to rest any resentments, fears or harms we have accumulated over the course of our using or drinking. The big book states that these are what lead to relapses, and until we say goodbye to them we will never fully recovery. In many ways, the fifth step is a way for us to say goodbye to our old behaviors as alcoholics and addicts and embrace our new sober way of living.

How do we do this?

We do this by being completely honest with ourselves, our sponsor and our higher power. We acknowledge what we have done, how it was wrong and why we did it. We see our part in what happened in the past.  This allows us to consider taking the next steps necessary to right the wrongs from our past.

The fifth step is not designed to make us feel guilt or shame for what we have done.  It’s there so we can let go of any feelings of guilt and shame we may have been holding on to. We do this in a safe place with a person we trust, and we process our entire fourth step during this time. We can only move beyond guilt and shame when we admit to our part in our wrongs.  By sharing, we remove the secrecy, shame and guilt we may feel.  Many feel liberated after completing the fifth step.

Once you finish this, it’s time to move on to the sixth step of addiction recovery, where we learn to accept our past. The fifth step is one of the more difficult steps to work through and brings up a mix of different emotions, but the necessity of this step cannot be stressed enough.  The rewards are certainly worth it.

New Hope Recovery Center is Chicago’s premier alcohol and drug addiction treatment facility.  New Hope With Pride  provides specific programming for our LGBT community members. If you would like guidance or help in handling your own addiction or that of a loved one, please contact us at 773.883.3916.

New Hope Recovery Center supports recovery addiction by offering a number of open meetings at our facility for those looking to participate in a 12 step program.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

Perhaps the hardest part of drug or alcohol addiction treatment is actually getting there. The fears about entering an addiction treatment program or facility (rehab) can overpower the will to get sober and keep someone from getting the help they need. With so many unknowns involved, it’s not surprising many people initially decide against treatment for their addiction.

But how many of these fears are healthy and how many are irrational? It’s important to remember that fear or anxiousness surrounding addiction treatment and sobriety is normal and is something most people go through.

People have all sorts of fears about treatment that can range a variety of different questions.

  • Will I have to stop using/drinking forever?
  • How much will it cost?
  • Who can find out I went to treatment?
  • Will I be able to see my family?
  • Can I leave work to go to treatment?
  • Will I have to miss work to go to treatment?
  • How will addiction treatment impact my insurance?
  • How long will I be in treatment for?
  • What happens after rehab?

These are excellent questions.  But fear based on assuming certain answers can deter someone from getting help.  So get actual answers to these questions.  This will allow you to see what addiction treatment is like.

The best way to do this is to reach out to local treatment centers and ask them these questions directly. Most treatment teams have employees knowledgeable about almost all aspects of treatment.  Often you can make a confidential anonymous phone call or have an anonymous electronic chat to you’re your questions answered. Understand that the answers will vary based on different addiction treatment programs.  So be sure to contact more than one to make sure you find a treatment center that will fit for you and minimize your fears.

Another great way to get answers is to talk to others who have been through rehab. There is no better way of learning about something new than picking the brain of someone who has been there before. Have an honest conversation with someone who has been through it before, this can help alleviate your fears.

You can also ease some of your concerns and unknowns by doing do some research online.  Most treatment centers will have a frequent asked question page, or something comparable.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to change your life forever. If you’re thinking about going to treatment for an addiction, but are struggling with fears and unknowns surrounding it, do what you can to address those fears. Write down your fears down and questions and get answers.

New Hope Recovery Center would be happy to answer any of your questions.  Ideally we would love to answer the questions here, but because each person’s situation will be different, it is better if you contact us so we can fully understand your situation.  You can call us at 888-707-4673, email us at info@new-hope-recovery.com or chat with us online by visiting our website: www.new-hope-recovery.com.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

Want more information about seeking help? Check out our Journal for related articles or see below:

Intensive Outpatient: The New Standard? Drug addiction and alcoholism is a progressive disease, so there are many stages of the disease and many different levels of care in which you can treat them. Although the 28 day treatment programs are effective for the severe/chronic cases, Intensive Outpatient is a great alternative. Most people think of a 28 day treatment program when they think of rehab for alcoholism or some other substance addiction.

Residential Drug Rehab: The Inpatient Treatment Option: Finding the right drug and alcohol treatment center can be overwhelming with all the different types of programs available. With so many terms, acronyms and levels of care, many are overwhelmed before they even decide on a program. Residential Day Treatment, Partial Hospitalization, Intensive Outpatient, Inpatient are just a few of the more commons ones. The most well known, inpatient and residential is what has become synonymous when people think of “drug and alcohol rehab.”

Drug or Alcohol Addiction Rehab in Chicago: Seeking help for a drug or alcohol addiction is often an overwhelming and confusing process.  Deciding to get help is a huge step, but can often lead to feeling  overwhelmed wondering where to start.  With so many options (including self-help groups such as AA, NA, CA, CMA, etc.) available, it can seem like a daunting task.

How to Find the Best Treatment Center in Chicago: If you are seeking treatment for yourself or a loved one for the first time, searching the Internet can be extremely overwhelming. There are numerous treatment centers in Chicago, and even more throughout Illinois. Whether you are searching for yourself or a loved one, it is important to know the right questions to ask a drug and alcohol treatment center. It is also important to look at the needs of the individual and make sure you are preparing for long term care.

Insurance Coverage & Rehab – Will your insurance pay for treatment? The reason for having health insurance is to alleviate the large financial burden when dealing with any type of illness.  However, insurance providers are not forthcoming with all the information related to an individual with chemical dependency or substance abuse treatment needs. Insurance providers claim there are no “limits” on benefits for rehab, but all benefits are based on medical necessity. What often goes unstated, is the insurance provider is the sole entity determining what constitutes to be medically necessary.

Addiction Recovery: Step 4 - Moral Inventory

For many with drug, alcohol, sex or other additions, working through the 12 steps have been not only a life saver, but a life-enhancer.  They find their lives are much better than they would have been without working the steps.  The fourth step of addiction recovery seems to have a reputation amongst 12 step groups. For one, it is the first step where you put pen to paper and do some work.  People are also hesitant because of the work itself. This step of addiction recovery, more so than others, causes people to pull back the reins and balk.

“Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves”

Many take a look at this step and wonder, “What is a fearless moral inventory?” Simply put, this step makes individuals take a look at their lives and pinpoint when they were selfish, self seeking, harmful or untruthful. It provides a safe place for people in addiction recovery to look back and see the mistakes they have made, but more importantly allows them to learn from the mistakes and move on. The importance of doing this step with a sponsor cannot be stressed enough for this reason.

Many procrastinate doing the 4th step due to feelings of shame and guilt or out of fear of stirring up old hurts.  But doing the fourth step allows us to see our defects of character and helps us realize why we did these things and how the behaviors are tied in to our addiction. In theory, moving away from our “alcoholic behaviors” will help prevent us from drinking alcohol or using drugs again in the future. The fourth step looks at your resentments, fears and harms in depth, and specifically considers what your part in them is. The real power behind this step is taking time to look at these behaviors all at once in a safe environment. Most addicts in recovery know about these behaviors, but the fourth step helps you look at them in a new light.  It’s a way to leave them behind and move on to new behaviors that promote our sobriety and help us live a better life.

Until we really review and acknowledge our past behaviors, we cannot move past them. Keeping them hidden or unobserved only allows these past behaviors to continue to reemerge in our lives.  By examining them and understanding them, we can learn to move beyond the behaviors and the patterns that led to them.

After doing a thorough fourth step, or fearless moral inventory, we are ready to move on in our step work, which helps facilitate removing these behaviors from ourselves, and ultimately making amends for these behaviors. The fourth step is the first of many “actions steps”, steps which require rigorous action to gain sobriety as opposed to decision.  Though difficult at times, the fourth step is in many ways the foundation for the rest of the steps that follow.  Step 5 of addiction recovery is next!

New Hope Recovery Center is Chicago’s premier alcohol and drug addiction treatment facility.  New Hope With Pride  provides specific programming for our LGBT community members. If you would like guidance or help in handling your own addiction or that of a loved one, please contact us at 773.883.3916.

New Hope Recovery Center supports addiction recovery by offering a number of open meetings at our facility for those looking to participate in a 12 step program.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

As 2013 comes to a close, we wanted to review our most popular articles during the year.  In reviewing the most viewed articles, four major themes emerge as the top concerns and focus of our readers during this year.

Warning Signs

It is clear that many people are interested in determining if they or a loved one suffers from addiction.  Several of our most-read articles dealt with warning signs for various potential addictions.

 

Heroin, Heroin, Heroin

If there was one prominent addiction theme during 2013, it was definitely heroin.  Heroin received both local and nationwide focus.  Its availability and low price seemed to put it at the forefront for many addiction treatment centers.  Sadly, too many lives were lost due to heroin use this past year, including Cory Monteith from Glee.  Many Chicago-area counties have seen a large increase in the number of heroin/opiate related deaths. Several of our most reviewed articles dealt with heroin.  In addition to the Heroin Abuse Warning Signs mentioned above, these two articles were also very popular:

 

Parents Concern for Their Children

Another area that received the many readers involved articles written for parents about their children's addiction.  The number of late teens and early twenties in treatment has been drastically increasing in recent years.  The following were our most popular articles geared toward parents:

 

LGBTQI

The final area of our most-read articles dealt with LGBTQI issues and concerns:

All of us at New Hope Recovery Center wish you a Healthy and Happy New Year.  We are looking forward to 2014 and will continue to provide helpful articles on current issues and concerns seen by us and our clients and their families. You can reach New Hope Recovery Center at 888-707-HOPE (4673), or info@new-hope-recovery.com.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

The stages of change are a conceptualization that change is not a singular event; rather it is a series of steps someone progresses through.  The idea can be applied to any number of behaviors but it is especially helpful to view it through the lens of addiction.  Change is difficult.  People get comfortable with where they are at and it is much easier to stay immersed in that life, even if it is a destructive and detrimental one.  Learning more about how change comes about can be a helpful push in raising self-awareness and normalizing the recovery process.

Precontemplation

In this first stage the person affected by addiction does not see their problem and therefore does not have any consideration for changing.  Loved ones, coworkers, and health professionals may perceive the need for change but the person with the addiction feels safe with the status quo so they are resistant to recognizing the problem. They will most likely justify their behavior because they don’t see their actions as problematic.  The most viable option for others during this stage is to try to raise awareness about the risks of the problem.  The hope is that by expressing doubts and increasing education on the topic it will assist the person in becoming more self-aware about their addiction and consider changing.

Contemplation

If the person starts to consider change they have moved from precontemplation to contemplation.  The individual might start to notice that they have a problem but by in large they are still ambivalent about actual change.  They may be experiencing anxiety and avoidance about the idea of changing.  A common tool to address the ambivalence surrounding change in this stage is to write out or discuss the pros and cons about changing.  This may be enough to tip the scales for the individual if they believe the benefits outweigh the costs. Some people spend their entire lives in the contemplation stage because they do not see the costs as costly enough.  At the very minimum it will allow for a discussion about where the individual sees barriers to change.

Image Credit Found Below.

Preparation

This stage is evident once the individual makes a conscious decision to do something to change.  This stage is crucial and often overlooked because people jump right into action without realizing the energy and commitment it will require to change.  An effective preparation stage involves reaching out for help and researching worthwhile options of assistance.  It is essential to address the individual’s anxiety about change because during this stage the idea of changing becomes more concrete and it can be overwhelming.

Action

When the individual is ready to put their plan into place and pursue it they are actively working towards change.  This overt effort comes down to willpower and determination by the individual.  If the individual truly does not want to change they will revert back to an earlier stage, often contemplation.  Change is uncomfortable and anxiety-inducing but if the individual can receive proper support while addressing their addiction real change may start to come about.  It is important to recognize even the smallest of changes because seeing progress can be motivation for continued improvement.

Maintenance

The ongoing goal of this stage is to sustain the positive change in the individual’s life long term.  Change is fluid and therefore it is important for the individual to have an awareness of their triggers and subsequent coping mechanisms in order to address new challenges as they arise.  Acquiring new skills to avoid relapse is ongoing however relapse does still occur.  Relapse can be discouraging but it is not the end of the road.  No matter how spiraling the relapse may be a person can re-enter the cycle at any stage of change.  The knowledge and insight gained about the addiction is not erased in a relapse and therefore all is not lost.  Recovery is life-long and the path is not straight and narrow, there are detours.  It is helpful to continuously be mindful of one’s needs in order to not become complacent.  Working an active recovery program by staying connected with a sober network are good tools for achieving long term sobriety.

No matter which of the five stages you or a loved one are currently in, New Hope Recovery Center can be a resource and an agent for change.  Please call for more information 1-888-707-4673.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

Image Credited to: Adult Meducation. American Society on Aging and American Society of Consultant Pharmacists Foundation; adapted from DiClemente and Prochaska, 1998. Photo. <http://www.adultmeducation.com/FacilitatingBehaviorChange.html>

Read related posts about Addiction:

Family Roles and Addiction

Addiction and Family: Acceptance as a Step Towards Healing in Treatment

Addiction: Shame, Guilt & Dodgeball

Restoring Trust Damaged by Addiction (Part 1)

Restoring Trust Damaged by Addiction (Part 2)

Restoring Trust Damaged by Addiction (Part 3)