New Hope Recovery Center believes that addiction, much like other life threatening illnesses, is a treatable disease. Our treatment provides education and counseling to better assist you and your family understand the nature of addiction. Please contact us if you have further questions regarding all forms of addiction.

NEW HOPE RECOVERY CENTER ANNOUNCES CHICAGO’S ONLY RECOVERY MEETING EXCLUSIVELY FOR THERAPISTS 

AND HEALING PROFESSIONALS

New Hope Recovery Center

  • Seeking a recovery meeting without worry of seeing clients?

  • Want to attend a recovery/support meeting dedicated to those in the Healing Professions?

Refuge Recovery and New Hope Recovery Center announce the only Chicagoland Recovery Meeting exclusively for Therapists, Clinicians and Other Healing Professionals.  Join us for weekly Refuge Recovery Meetings every Sunday from 9am-10:15am beginning May 7, 2017 at New Hope Recovery Center, 2835 N. Sheffield Ave., Suite #308, Chicago, IL 60657.  Questions, call 773-883-3916.

Directions to New Hope Recovery Center:
On Sheffield one block north of the Diversey Brown line stop.  Parking available in front of Core Power Yoga and on street.
Refuge Recovery is a community of people using the practices of mindfulness, compassion, forgiveness and generosity to heal the pain and suffering addiction has caused us and our loved ones. We follow the Four Truths of Refuge Recovery, a Buddhist-oriented path to addiction recovery, proven successful with addicts and alcoholics who commit to the Buddhist path of meditation, generosity, kindness, and renunciation.  Beginners and curious healing professionals are welcome.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

New Hope Recovery Center is located in Chicago and offers individualized alcohol and drug addiction treatment in a loving supportive environment.  We support all avenues to recovery and offer two Refuge Recovery Meetings each week as well as SMART Recovery, NA, AA and CMA meetings.    Contact New Hope Recovery Center at 888-707- 4673 (HOPE).

NCADJeff Zacharias, New Hope Recovery Center President and Clinical Director, recently spoke at the National Conference on Addiction Disorders (NCAD) on the Intersection of Sex, Drug and Technology.

Behavioral Healthcare Magazine summarized several main points of the talk to help clinicians when working with LGBTQI clients:

  • Social Media is the new drug dealer with the GPS phone as the new corner spot
  • Understand that most chem-sex clients have experienced trauma
  • Trauma in the LGBTQI community often begins early in life
  • Help the client feel safe and calm

You can request the Powerpoint of Jeff's talk but emailing info@new-hope-recovery.com

LGBT addiction treatmentNew Hope Recovery Center and its New Hope with Pride Program have extensive experience working with the LGBTQI individuals and the community. For more information call 888-707-4673(HOPE) or email us at info@new-hope-recovery.com.

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

 

 

 

New Hope Recovery Center is pleased to announce that it will be hosting the FIRST Refuge Recovery Meeting in Chicago on Friday July 29, 2016 at 7pm.  The meeting will be held at New Hope Recovery Center, 2835 N. Sheffield Ave., Suite 308, Chicago, IL 60657.

Refuge Recovery is a mindfulness-based addiction recovery community that practices and utilizes Buddhist philosophy as the foundation of the recovery process. Drawing inspiration from the core teachings of the Four Noble Truths, emphasis is placed on both knowledge and empathy as a means for overcoming addiction and its causes. Those struggling with any form of addiction greatly benefit when they are able to understand the suffering that addiction has created while developing compassion for the pain they have experienced. 
Refuge Recovery is a practice, a process, a set of tools, a treatment, and a path to healing addiction and the suffering caused by addiction. Buddhism recognizes a nontheistic approach to spiritual practice. The Refuge Recovery program of recovery does not ask anyone to believe anything, only to trust the process and do the hard work of recovery.
Refuge Recovery is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to build an extensive and comprehensive network of Refuge Recovery groups, meetings, and communities that practice, educate, and provide Buddhist teachings and meditations for anyone seeking recovery from addiction.  
New Hope Recovery Center is proud to offer this new unique addition to Chicago's Recovery Community.  For more information, contact New Hope Recovery Center at 888-707-HOPE (4673) or 773-883-3916 or email us at info@new-hope-recovery.com.  New Hope is located immediately North of the Diversey Brown Line 'L stop on Sheffield.

 

Written by: New Hope Recovery Center

National Drug Facts Week: January 26 - February 1, 2015Addiction Treatment Drug Facts

National Drug Facts Week℠ (NDFW) is an annual health observance week for teens to shatter the myths about drugs and drug abuse. NDFW centers on community events for teens, NIDA’s Drug Facts Chat Day, and partnerships.

There are great resources available at the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  For example here are interesting Quizzes about Specific Drugs:

Methamphetamines

Opiates

Hallucinogens

Marijuana

Stimulants

Did you know that drug overdose kills more Americans than car accidents?

Can you help spread the FACTS?

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

 

attachment theory and addictionThere are many theories to explain the etiology of addiction.  Historically, various models have been developed, become widely accepted and then rejected or modified as new theories emerged and our understanding of addiction grew.  One model that has been gaining popularity is the concept of addiction as an attachment disorder.

Attachment theory comes from the work of John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth.  Much of their research was done in the mid-1900's and sought to prove that human infants instinctually become distressed and agitated when separated from primary caregivers.  Additionally, when tired, stressed or fearful, an infant will purposefully seek out physical proximity and contact with the caregiver.

Much more recently, many researchers have recognized and sought to better understand the connection between maladaptive attachment patterns and the development of addiction (http://www.substanceabusepolicy.com/content/1/1/32, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030646030600270X, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460305001553).  From the disease model of addiction, we know that there is both a genetic and an environmental component to addiction and that both can change brain chemistry and structure.  One such change is the neurological consequences of poor or inhibited early attachment experiences.  Much of attachment theory is based on 2 variables described by Bowlby: dependability of an attachment figure, and judgement about worth of self as reflected back by the attachment figure.  Both of these factors heavily influence later behavioral and personality consistency as well as one's emotional regulation.  We now have a better understanding of the way that childhood relationships affect adult attachment styles (i.e an individual raised in an addictive environment will tend to display a more insecure attachment style throughout adulthood).

Early attachment deficits have been shown to be correlated with many addictions, and it is thought that those with poorer emotional regulation use substances or addictive behaviors to help regulate themselves. (http://www.naadac.org/attachmentandtrauma, Addiction as an Attachment Disorder, by Philip J. Flores)  Additionally, secure attachment is necessary for optimal functioning within relationships (having the capacity for both intimacy and independence).  When attachment style is insecure and one develops an addiction, a vicious cycle begins:  increasing addiction leads to more and more isolation from others, and therefore perpetuating the insecure attachment style.

Research has shown that 12-Step programs are a highly effective solution for addiction recovery when viewed through the lens of attachment theory because these programs focus on social support, connection with others and unconditional positive regard for self and others (Smith and Toniga, 2009).

Although attachment styles are formed in early childhood and do carry over into our adult lives, those with insecure attachment styles can learn healthier, more adaptive ways of interacting with others and can improve their capacity for intimacy within relationships.  In terms of addiction treatment, this can be a crucial concept for counselors and therapists to understand in their efforts to tailor the treatment in this manner as well as helping the recovering individual decrease shame that is so often attached to addiction.

New Hope Recovery Center is located in Chicago and offers individualized alcohol and drug addiction treatment in a loving supportive environment.  Contact New Hope Recovery Center at 888-707- 4673 (HOPE).

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

Best Addiction Articles 2014To start the New Year, we wanted to highlight our most-read articles from 2014. A few themes showed up in this year's Top 15:  Heroin, Sex Addiction and Marijuana all had more than one article in the top 15. Articles around Treatment and Recovery were quite popular as well.

 

Here are our 15 most popular articles from 2014:

Heroin Related Articles:

Celebrities Who Have Used Heroin - This was our most popular article from 2014.  We discuss 12 celebrities who have used or were addicted to heroin, but are now in recovery.  Their stories have been inspiring for many of our clients.

Chicago Heroin Addiction Facts 

Marijuana and Teens:

38 Marijuana Warning Signs: Is Your Teen Smoking Weed?

Marijuana Use Affects Teen Brain Development

Recovery and Treatment Articles:

Why Spirituality Is Important In Addiction Recovery - This article was our most popular on LinkedIn in 2014.  Many therapists and counselors found it to be a helpful way to discuss spirituality with their clients, particularly younger clients.

Drug Rehab & Alcohol Rehab: 6 Differences Between Men and Women - This was our 2nd most popular article for 2014.

What You Should Know About Vivitrol and Addiction Treatment

6 Tips for a Sober Thanksgiving - Although published quite recently, this article made it into the top 15.  It contains great advice for handling the holidays and family while in recovery.

Addiction Counseling: Abstinence Versus Harm Reduction - Harm reduction versus abstinence continues to be a hot button topic for many.  In this article we try to show how the hardline distinction between the two approaches has be softening recently.

Sex and Love Addiction were popular during 2014:

3 Levels of Sex Addiction

19 Warning Signs of Sex Addiction

10 Signs of Sex, Love and Relationship Addiction

Articles About Specific Addictions:

Xanax Addiction

Why Crystal Meth is So Addictive

19 Symptoms of Alcoholism; Being an Alcoholic

 Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

New Hope Recovery Center is a premier treatment facility located in Chicago, Illinois.  We can be reached at 888-707-4673 (HOPE).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addiction is a family disease that affects everyone connected to the addict. So what should family and friends do (and not do) when someone they love is addicted? 

Addiction is a disease of the body, mind and spirit from which people can and do recover. Like any other disease, no one intends to get sick or wishes it upon someone. Addiction recovery is a process of healing from the different layers of pain, disappointment, shame and guilt that come with addiction.

What not to do:

  • Do not think you can control the addict or the addiction.  Understand that the addict and the addiction are beyond your control.  You can only control yourself.
  • Do not enable the addict or alcoholic. There is a difference between helping and enabling someone.  Helping someone is doing something for someone which they are not capable of doing themselves. Enabling someone is doing for someone something they can do and should do for themselves.  Helping looks at the long term benefits and consequences, whereas enabling only looks at the immediate situation or drama.
  • Do not make threats you won’t be able to follow through on. Addicts/alcoholics will continue to push any boundaries to the limits and weaken your resolve. Set limits you can keep and then keep them.
  • Do not shame or scorn the addict/alcoholic. Addiction is a shame based disease and does not need any more shaming to fuel itself. The addict/alcoholic often suffers from chronic shame which includes different levels of low self-worth, low self-esteem, self-hatred, and a distorted self-image.
  • Do not make excuses or cover up for the addict/alcoholic.  Allow them to experience the full consequences of their addiction. Do not deny or minimize the addiction or its severity. Trying to fix their problems, manage their lives or control the addict’s behaviors only prolongs the addict from learning to be accountable and responsible for their actions. They are kept from learning the valuable lessons they need in order to grow and change.
  • Do not allow your emotions to get the best of you. You have ridden a roller coaster of emotions long enough; it is now time for you to get off the ride. If you find yourself getting overly emotional in dealing with the addict/alcoholic, step away until you can be calm.  Addiction creates drama, so be prepared for how you will act before the drama begins.

What to do:

  • Be patient while the addict/alcoholic is in recovery. Recovery is a journey not a destination.  Recovery will happen in several stages and may not happen in a neat line.
  • Do what you can at the moment. There will be situations where you will be hesitant or confused about what to do. Make the best decision you can at the time and move one.  Learn what works and doesn’t work and act accordingly.  Remember to fully accept that you made the best decision at the time with the information you had available.
  • Do focus on yourself not on the addict/alcoholic. Loved ones need to focus their efforts on staying healthy. You can’t help the addict if you are not healthy and cannot help yourself. You and your families’ well-being depends on it.
  • Set boundaries for your long-term health and sanity. Lovingly (and frequently, if necessary) insist that your boundaries be respected and state the consequences for any violation of your boundaries.  Follow through on these consequences. See your follow-through as an act of love that builds trust for yourself and the addict/alcoholic.
  • Do identify and recognize the different areas of life that have been neglected as a result of your preoccupation with the addict/alcoholic and begin to rectify any damage done.
  • Do practice letting go of your need to fix, manage or control the addict/alcohol or situations and circumstances that arise from the addiction. This is sometimes called "release with love”.
  • Do seek help for yourself and other family members. Getting outside help is often critical for complete healing and growth. It can also provide a healthy perspective on your situation and interactions.  Seek out a therapist, counselor, Al-AnonNar-anon, Smart Recovery, Co-Dependents Anonymous, Adult Children of Alcoholics or some other group that focuses on those who are affected by an addict/alcoholic.

Change will take time but will be a beautiful journey of uncovering, discovering, and recovering your lives. You will not only survive, but thrive.

Remember: Progress, not Perfection

New Hope Recovery Center provides individualized treatment for all clients.  We understand that each client is unique.  If you or someone you love is struggling with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, you can reach us at 888-707-4673 (HOPE) or info@new-hope-recovery.com.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

 

 

addiction recoverySelf Esteem....We hear the term thrown around a lot these days.  What is it, how is it different from self-confidence, and what does it mean in terms of our recovery from addiction?

Self esteem is generally defined as our perception of ourselves.  “Good” self esteem includes being secure and accepting of who we are, flaws included.  We are happy with what we see in the mirror and comfortable in our own skin. Self confidence has to do with our perceived abilities to do or accomplish something.  It is usually a result of having been able to overcome certain obstacles, difficulties or challenges in the past.

Self esteem and self confidence are not mutually exclusive concepts.  It is common for one to affect the other.  It is important to strengthen both in addiction recovery.  Without self confidence, we are likely to feel that we cannot cope with life’s challenges unless we use drugs, alcohol or our addictive behaviors.  We may feel that recovery is not worth working at because relapse is inevitable and we will ultimately “fail” at yet another endeavor.  There can be a “what’s the use” attitude with low self-confidence.

Without a healthy self esteem, we may feel that we are not worthy of recovery or of experiencing good things in our lives.  We may think that others won’t want to spend time with us as we really are...sober.

Most people dealing with addiction feel low self esteem.  Many wonder if they became engaged in addictive behaviors because of low self esteem, or if their self esteem decreased as a result of their addictive behaviors.  But if we get bogged down with this chicken and egg type questions, we may never fully immerse ourselves in recovery.  And this will prevent us from building up our self confidence as well as our self esteem.

In addiction recovery we are taught that we must have humility.  It is easy to confuse the difference between low self esteem and humility.  To be humble is to recognize our mistakes and shortcomings and to graciously accept and use our strengths.  It is having a right-sized view of ourselves and others and our importance in the world around us.  It is seeing that we are part of a very big world and our needs and wants are equal with those around us.

Having humility allows us to improve both our self esteem as well as our self confidence.  By admitting our mistakes honestly to ourselves and to others as part of a program of rigorous honesty, we learn to feel confident that others not only can and will accept us, but will love us all the more for our mistakes and shortcomings.  We learn that we can handle emotional intensity, conflict and confrontation without the aid of drugs or alcohol.  As our self confidence grows, our self esteem will often follow.

Building self esteem is not a quick project, but can be done.  When we allow ourselves to be seen truly as we are, we realize that our imperfections and shortcomings are our gifts to share with others.  We can see and our mistakes are our battle scars that prove where we’ve been and that can help others.

New Hope Recovery Center provides individualized treatment for all clients for long term recovery.  We understand that each client is unique.  If you or someone you love is struggling with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, you can reach us at 888-707-4673 (HOPE) or info@new-hope-recovery.com.

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

 

addiction in the familyAddiction doesn’t happen in a bubble, it has a way of altering a family and the interactions of family members.  The effect addiction in the family has becomes quite apparent when we look at the dysfunctional communication roles that family members often take on.  These interactions are fittingly called The Drama Triangle.  There are three roles in the Drama Triangle and each one is reactive and manipulative instead of honest and authentic.

What Are The Roles People Play When Addiction Exists In A Family?

Victim: This person continually feels victimized for what others are doing to him or her.    They feel helpless and hopeless.  Victims typically have unrealistic expectations and feel despair, vulnerability, and suffer chronic disappointment. Victims or martyrs tend to communicate in passive ways.  The victim avoids responsibility by blaming others and trying to control them with guilt.  This person feels “less than” the persecutor and often receives pity and is taken care of by the rescuer.

Persecutor: This person acts out in order to get revenge and/or offend others, as a way of avoiding his or her own discomfort.  Persecutors often communicate in an aggressive way.  They blame and criticize others.  They see everything as win/lose and insist on “being right”.  This person feels “better than” the victim and uses intimidation and threats to feel power and try to boost self-esteem.

Rescuer: This person is a natural caretaker and very non-confrontational.  They keep secrets and enable addictive behaviors.  Rescuers provide unasked help (while neglecting themselves) and often feel tired, depleted, unappreciated, and resentful. Rescuers communicate in a passive-aggressive way.  This person feels superior to both the persecutor and the victim.  Rescuers concentrate on others in an effort to avoid turning inward.

If you see yourself in different roles in different situations, that is expected!   

People will start in one role and often move around the triangle to different roles, sometimes within one interaction.  For instance, consider an alcoholic who is out late drinking while their partner is at home worried.  The alcoholic may come home to an angry partner (persecutor role) and instantly be in the victim role but then try to turn the blame onto his/her partner (therefore reversing the roles).  The interaction may then evolve further with the partner helping the alcoholic to bed and calling into work on his/her behalf the next day (rescuing role).

Also, don’t forget this is the drama triangle, so these roles are assumed when things are going awry.  These are not permanent roles.  However, as we know as an addiction progresses things go awry more and more often.

Why Would Anyone Participate In The Drama Triangle?

We take on these roles because subconsciously there is a perceived benefit to each one.

  • The victim receives pity and doesn’t need to take full responsibility for their actions.
  • The rescuer feels superior although over time they feel unappreciated, frustrated and tired from their attempts to rescue.
  • The persecutor feels a sense of power and entitlement and demands respect from others.

But these benefits are really an illusion, Claude Steiner comments, “The victim is not really as helpless as he feels, the rescuer is not really helping, and the persecutor does not really have a valid complaint.”  All the roles have something in common: by taking on a role, you don’t have to deal with your own issues or take responsibility for your own actions.  The roles serve the purpose of getting our adult needs met but in immature ways.  All three roles share a lack of boundaries and hinder one’s ability to be intimate and/or respond to others appropriately.

How To Step Out Of The Drama Triangle?

The only person you can control is yourself.  You can begin to step out of the unmanageability of the drama triangle by:

  • Recognizing that there is a Drama Triangle that is not working
  • Setting healthy boundaries
  • Taking responsibility for your own actions
  • Speaking honestly, calmly saying what you really mean
  • Having respect for yourself and others
  • Valuing the relationships more than being right, or better than

If you or a loved one is repeatedly in The Drama Triangle because of addiction.  You can get help getting out by contacting New Hope Recover Center at info@new-hope-recovery.com or 773-883-3916.  For more information about us visit our website at www.new-hope-recovery.com.

Other articles you may find interesting: Family Roles and Addiction

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center

 

“We were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character”

addiction recovery changeAfter completing the Fifth Step with our sponsors, recognizing and disclosing the exact nature of our wrongs, a realization sets in: without changing our destructive behaviors we cannot experience the full benefits of the recovery program.  In Step Six, a sense of humility is developed in order to see ourselves more clearly.  We have seen the wrongs we have committed and how they have harmed ourselves and others when we acted out our defects of character.  We begin to see patterns to our behaviors and also realize that we are likely to act on the same defects repeatedly. As we continue with our addiction recovery, in Step Six we become entirely ready to have our defects of character removed, without reservations.  The concept of becoming entirely ready does not happen suddenly.  It is a process which can take the course of one’s lifetime.

We have to identify, recognize and accept our defects of character before we can be willing to have a power greater than ourselves remove them.

Step Six is a step of willingness and action that prepares us for a launch to a higher level of consciousness. “We found that the higher our drugs took us, the lower they brought us” NA Basic Text, Step Three, page 24 (Fourth Edition). In other words, the more intoxicated one gets, the more toxic one becomes.

A very important way to identify character defects is by being receptive to the constructive feedback of others, particularly when we offend them with our behaviors.

Here are some common examples of character defects:

  • anger
  • resentments
  • sarcasm
  • cynicism
  • false pride
  • self-pity
  • self-doubt
  • self-indulging
  • perfectionism
  • defiance
  • distrust
  • dishonesty

There will most likely be layers upon layers of negative behaviors that point to these defects.  “When working this step it is important to remember that we are human and should not place unrealistic expectations on ourselves,” NA Basic Text, page 33 fourth edition.

Reciting this prayer during times of despair or when it seems to be taking a long time to reach a desired goal can help sustain us and renewing our willingness to have our character defects removed.

Sixth Step Prayer

I am ready for Your help in removing from me the defects of character which I now realize are an obstacle to my recovery.  Help me to continue being honest with myself and guide me toward spiritual and mental health. 

New Hope Recovery Center, Chicago’s premier alcohol and drug addiction facility, offers treatment to those addicted to drugs or alcohol and their families.

If you or someone you love is affected by addiction, New Hope Recovery Center can help. Contact us at 773-883-3916 or info@new-hope-recovery.com.

Other articles on the 12 Steps:

Step 1 , Step 2 , Step 3, Step 4, Step 5

Written By: New Hope Recovery Center