Emerging Adults Program

Our Emerging Adult Program provides supportive programming, as well as educational sessions, for emerging adults – those between the ages of 18 to 26 during their transition to adulthood.  Emerging Adults face many major life changes during this time of identity exploration, self-focus, initiation of new roles, development of new social networks, increased independence, and decreased parental guidance. Sometimes the life skills needed for a successful transition into adulthood have not been provided to, or learned by, the emerging adult.  Our Emerging Adult Program helps emerging adults gain these critical life skills and become educated about drinking/drug use to help avoid long lasting problematic alcohol/drug use.

Want more information? Below are some articles from our journal about emerging adults.

Student Drug Abuse Warning Signs: Young adults face many temptations and opportunities to use and abuse drugs and alcohol.  As a parent, it is important to allow for appropriate independence and growth for your student or young adult, but also to keep a watchful eye looking for warning signs or symptoms of drug or alcohol use/addiction. Part of growing up involves making mistakes and hopefully learning from them.  These teachable moments allow students and emerging adults to learn how to respond better in the future.  Students and emerging adults may not always be able to quickly identify and correct mistakes or difficulties they face. They also are more susceptible to peer pressure or having their viewpoints shaped by outside influences. For this reason, parents need to be closely aware of what is happening in their young adult’s life…

Emerging Adults – Time of Stress, Change, and Possibly Addiction: The period after high school through the late 20s is now considered a unique developmental phase, Emerging Adulthood.  For Emerging Adults life is typically filled with an unprecedented amount of change and a time for asking many deeply-personal life questions. Emerging Adults frequently change residences (slightly more than 30% move every year); change jobs (averaging seven jobs during their 20s); move back with parents (more than 40% move back in with their parents at least once during their 20s); and often spend time living with a romantic partner (66%).  These changes can lead to high levels of stress and anxiety…

Fighting Peer Pressure: 3 Ways To Limit Addiction Risk in Young Adults Do you remember growing up and wanting to be liked and included in your peer group?  One of the hardest parts of growing up is feeling excluded from peer groups and while this can be challenging, it is also a normal part of the development of an Emerging Adult.  If it did not come naturally, you might remember changing your attitudes, values or behaviors to belong a certain peer group, which is exactly where your Emerging Adult may be developmentally…

3 Recommended Interventions to Reduce Binge Drinking: Binge drinking among emerging adults remains a major concern for parents, mental health professionals and college administrators since it is more common among those ages 18-34. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), binge drinking is considered 5 or more drinks for men and 4 or more drinks for women, in about 2 hours.  Those who are concerned about binge drinking have well-founded reasons given the serious consequences such as alcohol poisoning, injuries or death, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, violence, health problems, academic underachievement, mental health problems and more…

Long Term Impact of Alcohol and Drug Use on Emerging Adults: Emerging Adulthood, the period of life from approximately age 18 to the late 20s, is not only a critical time for psychological and social development, but also for physical brain development. Contrary to a popular assumption that the brain is mature by the age of 18, recent studies have shown that profound brain growth and change still occur during Emerging Adulthood. The heavy use of drugs and alcohol during this time frame can inhibit a person’s brain development and have long term consequences…

Helicopter Parenting: Recipe for Alcohol or Drug Addiction? Mental health professionals continue to notice that young adults increasingly have difficulty transitioning into adulthood. They struggle with more emotional adjustment issues than ever before. These issues show up as a lower tolerance for stress and under-developed coping skills, during a time in their lives when these skills are most needed. Without these necessary coping skills, they are facing higher levels of depression, anxiety and substance abuse, including addiction to alcohol and drugs…